New Orleans Cold Drip Coffee Recipe Jump to recipe

New Orleans Cold Drip Coffee Recipe

Only the rich chicory coffee is smoother then the jazz in New Orleans. This coffee is enjoyed by so many people.

This iced coffee recipe, complete with a pinch of ground root, will produce a cup of brew that will make you feel like you’re in New Orleans.

We don’t know about you, but summer time ordering iced coffee becomes a part of our daily routine. Whether it’s a wake-up call or a lunch (or both, no judgments), the clear, sweaty, cold cup with roasted, icy and milky caffeine is practically an extension of our hands.

However, we’re all in for a routine blend, so we love this cold New Orleans-style drink – it’s a spin on the standard iced coffee fare, which offers a strong flavour with the perfect sweet balance and is surprisingly easy to make.
When was the days when you poured hot coffee into an ice cup? I suppose a long time 🙂

New Orleans Cold Drip Coffee Recipe

Cooking method: MixingOther
Courses: Drinks
Difficulty: beginner
Prep timeCook TimeRest TimeTotal Time
5 min 2 min - 7 min
Servings: 4 person
Calories: 160kcal
Best season: all

A Little History

France
What role has France played in the evolution of cold brew coffee?

One of the first recipes that closely resembles today’s iced coffee was developed by the French. This was the first Mazagran, a drink made by combining sweetened coffee concentrate and cold water.
Following the Treaty of Tafna, the French took control of the Mazagran fortress in 1837. When the soldiers returned to France and shared the recipe in French cafes, the Mazagran drink quickly spread throughout Europe.

Cold Brew Around the World
Cold-brew coffee has gradually gained popularity as a more efficient method of brewing coffee. Cold-brewed coffee had reached the majority of Europe, Asia, and America by the 1800s.
Cold-brewed coffee, in fact, played an important role in military provisioning around the world. Americans, French, British, and Scots all produced some form of coffee concentrate for their troops.
The British version is particularly well-known – they are known for Camp Coffee.
Historians believe that Camp coffee began with a request to Campbell from the Gordon Highlanders for a beverage that the army could easily use while in the field in India.

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Set your drip coffee maker so you can manually add water to the filter.
    For most coffee makers, this means turning the brew basket to the side and placing the pot underneath.

  2. Place the coffee, radicchio, and optional salt in a filter in the brew basket.

  3. Bring the water to a boil.
    Add enough water to moisten the grounds and radicchio, and then pour about 1/2 cup of water into the filter.

  4. Serve immediately or keep warm with your coffee maker until ready to serve.
    Optional: add sugar to taste.

    Enjoy!

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